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Nychos Takes A (Deep) Look Inside

Words:

Edd Norval
September 25, 2019

There's an innate childlike curiosity within us that wants to understand things. As a youngster, I'd endlessly be dismantling whatever I could, just to see what was inside, hoping it would tell me how the world worked. That's something I think Nychos and I had in common, only he's persevered with his thoughts, channelling them into an artistic identity that's recognisable, funny and thought-provoking.

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It also manages to scratch that itch. It shows us something so that we don't have to look ourselves. We can be thankful for that. Why? Because dissecting Ronald McDonald is not an easy task.


In a sentence that most would think they'd never have to write, we can understand the essence of Nychos - the artist who takes 'digging a little deeper' to very literal depths by producing humorous anatomical street art pieces that pop off the wall for their bright colours and challenging content.


Many of the Austrian artist's works seem to flirt with pop art, but never quite take it to bed. There's an element of the Roy Lichtenstein, the Andy Warhol and of course, comic books (yes, also Anatomical textbooks). His way of looking at the world retains the awe-struck charm of childhood wonder whilst intertwining it with the inherent darkness of death - a death that seems to have occurred before our very eyes as he lays out the subjects flesh and bones for us all to guiltily stare at.

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An iconoclastic and novel approach in a saturated street art market, Nychos has accumulated a formidable following who can't wait to see the brains and intestines of his next subject. He's sort of like a master surgeon performing illicit surgeries on walls around the world. Only, instead of a scalpel it's a spray can.


This X-Ray kind of approach is a vaguely surrealist and vaguely neo-realist style of graffiti. It doesn't completely step away from realism, yet it doesn't look for the photorealistic either. This may come from the origins of his animalistic approach. He grew up in the woodlands of his homeland with his father, a hunter. From an early age he was confronted with the brutality of nature in a way that we are far removed from, yet often long to be closer to.


A traumatising experience for the young boy, maturity allowed him to diagnose the difficult feelings through his own kind of primal scream therapy, where the pressure on the cap released something from within more than just the metal cylinder. We are all shaped by our life stories, but few have interpreted their own childhood so literally, whilst using it as the root of catharsis later on in life - especially in such a constructive manner. Nychos' paintings aren't quite like anyone else, but neither is Nychos, nor his own personal story.

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