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Dimitris Trimintzioa - Scenic Streets

Words:

Edd Norval
July 13, 2022

Dimitris Trimintzioa, better known as Taxis, is a Polish street artist whose muralistic style brings his comic book background into an urban setting, placing narrative assemblages in places where people would ordinarily passively pass through.

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By causing these breaks in route, Taxis asks his audience to think about art and the messages contained within each piece. The role and potential of artistic interventions have always factored into his psychology, having grown up in an avowedly artistic family, with his mother and father both actively engaged with the study and creation of art and its history.


This de facto education granted Taxis a bit of a head start. It meant his brain had an element of preconditioning to the manner he conceptualised art. Things that would otherwise take a bit of unlearning to learn, he already had in place. Maybe that’s why comics were Taxis first real artistic outlet. They’re immediate, accessible and without the pomp of more classical forms.


Growing up in Greece from the age of three, a trip home around a decade later provided the budding artist with some inspiration that Greece had, up until that time, largely failed to deliver. It was back in his country of birth that Taxis came across graffiti inspiring enough to form the genesis of what was to come his new life.

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At the axis of the two, comic and graffiti, came Taxis’ unique brand of street art. His murals are about the life he experiences around him. As Widewalls are quoted as saying, “Dimitris’s point of reference is the human himself. He is intrigued by the everyday inner struggle that society forces each individual to go through. In his art he aims to capture the feelings of desolation and hardship, feelings that have always tormented humanity.”


Interestingly, this article goes on to highlight the intentions behind Taxis’ work. He tries to state things that should be straightforward, but oftentimes come across as convoluted. Perception nowadays is skewed. It’s pushed into simplistic narrative dichotomies. Taxis aims to pull that apart and create nuance through art, provoking conversations that too often end up overlooked.


In doing so, he has become a sort of lone voice. Recently, many pastoral and landscape or natural themes are making it into his work, almost as if the artist has taken to a broader discussion, one fundamental to our increasingly urbanised lives. Have we departed too far from our innate human spirit in search of modernity?

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Whilst broad, the theme of modernity feels almost rejected in his murals - whose woodcut style can be derived from his father’s craft of etching - by placing scenes that depict an intense connection between human and land in areas that the complete opposite is experienced.


Taxis builds this tension into his work - whether on the street or in a frame - to push his audience to reexamine the relationship with themselves and the world around them. The dreamy and aspirational solitude is within our grasp, yet has been distanced by a need to survive in an environment and lifestyle increasingly hostile to our natural state of being.


Because of this, we look at his art in wonder, sitting uncomfortably between feelings of hope, loss, desire and nostalgia.

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