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Milu Correch - Thinking in m2

Words:

Edd Norval
June 7, 2018

After seeing two Argentinian street art icons, Lean Frizzera and Emy Mariani, host a workshop - Correch stopped thinking about filling in squares in a notepad and started thinking in m2.

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Buenos Aires is a colourful city. There is inspiration everywhere - from the sights and sounds to the smells. It's also one of South America's street art capitals that has developed in a semi-isolated state, developing its own urban visual language.


Correch had, of course, seen these large images around her home city. How could you not? They caught her eye and stuck in her mind, but she didn't really do anything about it. One day though, after hearing about a street art workshop, already artistically inclined, she decided to attend. From then on, nothing was the same for her.


Her first mural appeared in 2011 and from that point on - wall zero - she has been developing a thick emotional palette that adds a reflective melancholia to the walls she works on and to the cities they appear. The personal nature of her images made it feel personal to her. It would be dishonest to hide behind a veneer, so she signed with her full name - Milu Correch. Sometimes she even added her address.

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Something about size seems to attract Correch. She's as inclined to improve her work as she is to find a bigger surface to improve it on. Although firmly grounded in reality, the scale gives them a sense of disproportion that lends to surrealism, or considering her literary influences, even the South American school of magical-realism.


The looming characters seem like giants, such is their likeness, especially at a distance. Sometimes it's a lonely boy banging a crow-mounted drum and other times it's a group of elderly residents of a block of flats sitting around a table - reflecting, silent and imposing. Nonetheless, it made the building feel alive, reminding passersby that people were inside there at that very moment laughing, crying, making love and acting out war.


Besides literature, film is also a great influence on her work. It's apparent in the compositions - they are cinematic, often looking more like a still from an art-house film than a traditionally structured mural. Thinking about things in this way means that she utilises symbolism and mythological figures in ways less daunting than surrealism, yet with a depth that requires a little time to be spent - less you miss what she's trying to tell you.

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The past also figures heavily in her works. The world's seem like they're from a different era where human beings lived a bit more simply - devoid of the constant white-noise and distraction that tempers with our spiritual and social growth. Although the characters often seem possessed by a sadness - they still have soul and heart, they're still part of the dramatic interplay between imagination and realisation. It's a dream that we are awake in.


If you think about them like that, the idea of size makes a lot of sense. Our dreams entirely pervade our reality. It is the reality that we are experiencing at that very moment. The oddities of her work appear with the things that make you realise you're in a dream halfway through it. There's something there that shouldn't be, or something important missing.


Correch is on the hunt for new narratives to weave on larger walls and her work is becoming more sought after, so much so that very soon finding walls will probably not be too much of a chore. Beyond her work on the pieces, she's active in several organisations that look to maintain the importance and stature of urban art in society. As she did several years ago, she's offering other people a similar chance. The walls she paints are dreamworlds and off the wall, she keeps on trying to make them come true.

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