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Tim Klein's Puzzle Vision

Words:

Edd Norval
November 27, 2018

Tim Klein realised that many of the major puzzle manufacturers used the same die-cut pattern for their jigsaws. He has since created 'Puzzle Montage Art', a unique re-imagining of how a jigsaw can and should look, by juxtaposing contrasting images together as a whole.

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Klein has stated that he derives pleasure from unmasking these surreal images that are "lying latent, sometimes for decades, within the cardboard boxes of ordinary mass-produced puzzles." Utilising the puzzles in this unorthodox manner is somewhat akin to playing with the Rorschach Test to uncover subliminal and subconscious thoughts and desires. They offer an insight into the mind.


It's the feeling of discovering and re-arranging vintage puzzles into new, often bizarre, formations, that pushes Klein to continue developing this artistic model. Piecing together images that span from Renaissance art to animals and feats of engineering, the puzzles manage to seem vaguely natural, as if they were meant to be this way. That's the unique thing about the choice of using jigsaws, it meant that the pieces, quite literally, fit together.

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For many, the appeal of finishing a jigsaw is that a sense of order has been created out of chaos. What was a messy sprawl of incompleteness has now become a finished picture. Beauty has arisen from nothing - all thanks to the hand of the puzzle-master.


Klein's idea of beauty, and his sense of satisfaction, goes beyond creating things as they should be, but more importantly, as they could be. It is part of an important creative vision that we are inclined to see how the world could possibly look, compared to leaving it as it is.


His creations shift from the comically surreal to the profound. His penchant for using older puzzles, rather than the newer ones often created in Photoshop, means that they're a little less busy and have more room to breathe. As he creates these images, he sees himself as an archaeologist, brushing off artefacts and assembling them as he imagines they should be. He's not just an archaeologist, but a tailor, stitching together magnificent quilts and patchwork items, albeit with a hint of Dr. Frankenstein

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