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The Arsham Fieg Gallery - Home For Miniature Art

Words:

Edd Norval
February 27, 2019

Art galleries are full of art, yet are rarely conceptual spaces themselves. Even rarer could the gallery be considered a work of art. That's exactly what the Arsham Fieg Gallery in New York is though, art within art.

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Ronnie Fieg is a shoe designer, but also the owner of KITH, a brand and shop that helped revolutionise streetwear. Fieg has an innovative approach to design and culture, craving collaboration and viewing it as a definitive means of progression.


Daniel Arsham, likewise, is an innovative creator. The Cleveland born artist similarly draws on eclectic influences for his work which blends architecture, sculpture and performance.


Both can be noted for their clean aesthetic sensibility that often, although not exclusively, takes a minimalist form their works. Arsham's stark concrete-based works and Fieg's clean lines draw parallels between the pair and last year the two officially collaborated on an art gallery project, housed within one of KITH's stores, that blended both of their artistic approaches.

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The gallery signifies Fieg's expansion from fashion into art, yet is likely only the first step into this new territory. Many have went to the shop expecting to attend a traditional gallery space, but alas, this would not be the case. The three rooms often photographed are actually miniature and the artists that exhibit there, naturally, have to create unusually small pieces to fit in.


Fully equipped with hyperrealistic figures of the two founders, styled to be musing over the pieces in their gallery, AFG poses artists with an interesting challenge; to exhibit their normal work shrunk down, or to create something more site specific playing with the space's possibilities.


Having featured pieces from the likes of Tomokazu Matsuyama, Jean Jullien (whose characters actually took over the gallery, playing with our sense of perception) and most recently Vhils, the space itself is clearly a part of the artwork and, it stands to reason, will be incorporated in new and exciting ways in future shows.


Vhils' Panorama exhibition features the artist's three-dimensional and textured faces that examine the depths and dimensions of the human face in the context of being a semi-sculptural piece that retains the emotional energy of his work created on the walls of the world.

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See all of the past and present exhibitions here.

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