Image

Archive

About

Subscribe

Image
Image
Image
Image

Please, check your email.

Lost in Time: Tijuana Bibles

Words:

Edd Norval
May 30, 2019

Old World traditions are unimaginable now, in a hyper-connected world. Folklore and mythology struggle to flourish as the value of the spoken word is diminished by the limiting factors of the internet. Back in Prohibition America, these kinds of tales flourished and few as much as the cheap poorly made and sexually explicit Tijuana Bibles.

Share:

-

Bordering California in the lower South-West of the United States is Tijuana, of Mexico's Baja California in the country's North-West. The dusty roads that lined its streets at the turn of the 20th century was a cultural no-mans-land, still barren and stocked with outlaw characters and misfits. If the Old West was about to die, it lived on here for a little bit longer.


These books, pulp fiction printed on poor quality paper with crude and lewd content, illustrations of sexualised movie-stars or dirty jokes that had done the rounds, were produced illegally by (usually) unknown writers and artists, recognisable only by their pseudonyms and styles. The name - Tijuana Bibles - can be traced back to Southern California in the 1940s, but little else is actually known about these mysterious little magazines.


Tijuana carried with it an air of intrigue for Americans whose only real knowledge of the place was whispered by the mouths of a bootlegger or soldier's friend. Although it was within driving range, the bordertown couldn't have been further away from the perception of a developed and civilised America. Incidentally, it was this image that was cultivated to sell the books. There's very little to prove they were actually made there, rather that producers used the name as a form of guerilla advertising, making the prints seem even more exotic than they were.

Image

Exoticism was their purpose. First making their way into the States during the Depression era, the naughty pages were momentary escapism from the drudgery of life, where a country was failing to live up to its promise of freedom and prosperity. In a era remembered for smuggling, it remained a life most people were miles away from. However, these books were a gateway drug into illicit dealings that gave your average American cheap thrills when they were hardest to come by.


Bearing names like Tobasco Publishing Co., La France Publishing or London Press, the imprints were seen to come from all over the world, although this too is little substantiated. In all likeliness, the books had never lived beyond the confines of safe American life, not that it actually mattered. They weren't just selling simplistic pornography, but the idea of reaching freedom and experiencing the world, that brought customers back.


Buying one was a hush-hush ordeal, where whispered requests would lead to a nudge and a wink in bowling alleys, bars, garages, tobacco shops and barbers. They cost around 25 cents, a fair price for the underground operation. Rather than it being a large-scale business, although they always sold well, it's thought to have been the work of a small group of producers with their own printing press. Besides the magazines, they made other smutty products like pornographic playing cards and film reels.

Image

Unbeknownst at the time, these entrepreneurs were pioneers, establishing trading routs throughout the country, creating channels of distribution and more importantly, at least in an artistic sense, becoming innovators of underground comics, a form of politicised and confrontational art that was a crucial part in many of America's most prominent subcultures and social movements. Seeing the power they had, and the ability to infiltrate everyday homes, other radical thinkers soon tapped into this trade.


Limited by the postal service's strict regulations to stocking the units locally fed heavily into the DIY aesthetic and culture of punk music that gained popularity in 60s and 70s US. The anonymity of the artist proved that an idea and style could sell, not just a name - a revolutionary thought at a time when designers goods were being marketed and advertising to a previously unforeseen extent throughout American life.


Beyond punk and 'zine culture, the bibles heavily influenced Playboy magazine, comic artist Alan Moore and provided a means to make ends meet for thousands of stockists and sellers during one of America's most trying times. Some of the art was poor, but some had true satirical and artistic merit, giving newspapers a run for their money and, no doubt, pushing political cartoonists to up their game.

Image

Although they went out of fashion and quickly as they came in, numerous generations of re-prints diminished many of the original's quality to a blur. Still, the spirit lived on beyond the artefacts themselves. People will always seek a thrill and something with edge and excitement, especially when their normal lives offer up none - an idea that has taken on increasingly sinister connotations over subsequent years.


More than an indictment of the criminalised aspects of their production and distribution, it cast a judging blow to the idea of modern life - that a cheap little comic book was the ultimate means of escaping the gilded American Dream and that something with no advertising at all was able to outsell some of the best funded and well-backed American products of the day.

Image
Image
Image

Share:

-

More like this:

Please, check your email.

Image
Image
Image